Tag Archives: .NET

Do you want to become a software developer? Here’s a good chance to start

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Do you want to become a software developer even if you didn’t study computer science? If yes, keep reading since this post might be interesting for you!

As many of my readers might know already, I did not study computer science at all. Still, I am working in the IT industry for around 10 years, half of which I’ve spend working at Microsoft. I started coding around 3 years ago and right now I am working as a full stack software developer. My primary focus is .Net Core and Angular 2+ when it comes to front end. A big part of my work experience had also to do with training, coaching, webinars. Continue reading

Reference types and value types in .NET

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In .NET (and therefore C#) there are two main sorts of type: reference types and value types! Understanding these sorts of type is crucial in the .Net ecosystem and, more generally, in object oriented programming. There are some clear definitions of these concepts that anybody could learn fairly easy, but really understanding how reference types and value types work is sometimes a little bit harder. And I must confess that it took me some time to achieve a certain level of familiarity. Furthermore, if you really want to understand how reference types and value types work, you need to get your hands dirty an play around with them. In this article I will try to explain reference types and value types as good as I can, starting from some dry (but important) definitions that I will try to make more vivid using code samples.

Note: I also made a YouTube video on this topic with some more graphical representations of these concepts. You might want to check it out:

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Sorting lists in C#

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Working with lists is something developers do almost everyday. One of the most common tasks when we think about lists is sorting them. Fortunately, sorting lists in C# is not very complicated when it comes to primitive types and strings, but are slightly more complicated when we create lists of our own objects. In this tutorial we’ll go through some of the common ways to sort lists in C#.

Update: I have also created a video on this topic so if you think that it’s easier to follow the video, here it is:

Let’s start with a short and simple example. Let’s assume that we create a list of names and we add some names to the list:


List<string> names = new List<string>();
names.Add("John");
names.Add("Dan");
names.Add("Zack");
names.Add("Cristina");

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Do you want to become a software developer? Here’s how!

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So, do you want to become a software developer and you didn’t graduate computer science? Do you feel that “your time has passed” and you still think that there’s a lot more to achieve? Well, this post is for you, so you might want to keep on reading! If you ask yourself if this is even possible, well…. yes it is! I’ve studied philosophy and theology and still I’m working for almost ten years in the IT industry, I’m playing around with code for around 2 years and now I’m a software developer. Is it easy? Not at all! Or it depends on what “easy” means for you. But it’s achievable and here are a few guidelines on how you can become a software developer.  Continue reading

Create your own reusable C# libraries targeting .Net Standard

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A while back I tried to “demistify” the main concepts around .Net Core, .Net Standard and .Net Framework, since there were (and still are) a lot of questions and concerns regarding these topics on social media. This time, I’ve decided to go one step further and show you all these concepts at work . This article is intended for beginner .Net developers or self-taught developers like me, which struggle to find a clear path in a jungle full of information that is not always accurate.  Continue reading

C# enum friendly names

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If you develop using C# and the .Net ecosystem, chances are that you will need to use enums at a certain point. The enum keyword is used to declare an enumeration, a distinct type that consists of a set of named constants called the enumerator list. Enums are easy to use and especially useful if you have to work with some data data you don’t necessarily want to put in a database. Here’s a very short example of an enum: Continue reading

Deploy a NET Core console application using command line

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Few days ago I blogged about .NET Standard, .NET Core and .NET framework and I think it might be a goo idea to write something about .NET Core today. .NET Core is an open source, cross platform development framework in the .NET world. What I would like to do today is to show how to deploy a .NET Core console application using command line. This is nothing complicated or particularly useful, but it will help to get a better understanding on what “cross platform” means. I will use Visual Studio Code and the integrated terminal to run the needed commands. Continue reading

.NET Standard, .NET Core and .NET Framework demystified

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Reading Twitter and several discussion threads on GitHub  or Reddit, I came to the conclusion that there still is a lot of confusion when discussing .NET Standard, .NET Core and .NET Framework. The truth is, .NET Core and .NET Standard are still new and Microsoft also keeps making some changes when releasing different versions that add to the confusion. That’s why I will try to demystify these different components of the .NET world. Before getting into it, I would like to underline that this is my understanding and therefore I might be wrong at some points, but overall I think the overall picture is still helpful for clearing some of the confusion out there.  Continue reading