Tag Archives: .NET Core

Building SPAs with C#

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Looking at this title, many developers would say “Are you mad? You can’t build single page applications with C#! You need a front end framework, like Angular, React or Vue”. Right now I can’t say that I can prove them wrong, but I can definitely at least say that building SPAs with C# is in fact possible. For now it’s only experimental, but the ASP.NET team announced an experimental project called Blazor. Blazor is an experimental web UI framework based on C#, Razor, and HTML that runs completely in the browser via WebAssembly. This really opens new perspectives on the fact that you may build modern SPAs using C# and the entire .NET stack.  Continue reading

SQL design patterns for multi tenant applications

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Cloud computing is now growing at a very fast pace for over 4 years now. Strictly related to the increased adoption of cloud technologies there is also an increasing interest in software as a service, as companies of all sizes around the world realized the benefits of paying a subscription for the software they use. In these perspective, software development companies and independent developers around the world build now multi tenant applications. However, multi tenant applications are a tricky from the planning phase, since customer data needs to be strictly isolated, the application itself must be highly available and easily scalable. And, as I also briefly mentioned in my previous article, everything starts from the database. That;s why I would like to briefly point out the main SQL design patterns for multi tenant applications.

In practical examples I will refer mostly to Azure SQL databases and the .NET ecosystem, although the main design patterns are still valid for any relational databases you might want to use. A lot of these aspects are described in different Microsoft Azure documentation articles. My goal is to summarize information that is otherwise dissipated in different sources. Continue reading

Databases for modern web applications

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Databases are one of the first things to think about when developing new software, especially web applications. I know that at a first sight, this topic seems to be a little odd: you simply use a relational database like SQL or MySQL ant that’s it, right? Well, I think that modern web applications are a little bit more complex and it might be worth considering other options and that’s why I would like to tackle this topic.

Traditional relational databases are clearly a goo fit for static applications. By static I think about applications that don’t change very often or that don’t require a huge amount of read and write operations. For example, if I would like to build my own blog at a certain time, I would surely choose SQL. And if I think about the data model for a blog post, it could be designed as something like this: Continue reading

Deploy a NET Core console application using command line

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Few days ago I blogged about .NET Standard, .NET Core and .NET framework and I think it might be a goo idea to write something about .NET Core today. .NET Core is an open source, cross platform development framework in the .NET world. What I would like to do today is to show how to deploy a .NET Core console application using command line. This is nothing complicated or particularly useful, but it will help to get a better understanding on what “cross platform” means. I will use Visual Studio Code and the integrated terminal to run the needed commands. Continue reading

.NET Standard, .NET Core and .NET Framework demystified

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Reading Twitter and several discussion threads on GitHub  or Reddit, I came to the conclusion that there still is a lot of confusion when discussing .NET Standard, .NET Core and .NET Framework. The truth is, .NET Core and .NET Standard are still new and Microsoft also keeps making some changes when releasing different versions that add to the confusion. That’s why I will try to demystify these different components of the .NET world. Before getting into it, I would like to underline that this is my understanding and therefore I might be wrong at some points, but overall I think the overall picture is still helpful for clearing some of the confusion out there.  Continue reading