Tag Archives: .NET Core

ASP.Net Core 2.2 runtime events

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ASP.Net Core 2.2 was recently released and announce at the Microsoft Connect() conference in Las Vegas. Sure, there was a lot of hype on the .Net Core 3.0 announcement but ASP.Net Core 2.2 is now GA, while .Net Core 3.0 is only in preview. And since ASP.Net Core 2.2 is now globally available it also brings some new features that can be used in production. In this article I want to briefly describe one feature that in my opinion is the most useful one: runtime events.

It is often desirable to monitor runtime services such as the GC, JIT, and ThreadPool of the current process to understand how these services are behaving while running your application. On Windows systems, this is commonly done using ETW and monitoring the ETW events of the current process. While this continues to work well, it is not always easy or possible to use ETW. Whether you’re running in a low-privilege environment or running on Linux or macOS, it may not be possible to use ETW. Continue reading

What’s the point of .Net Core 3.0 desktop applications

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The Microsoft Connect() conference in Las Vegas took of on December 4th with some coll but not really unexpected announcements. For my interests the most important announcement was the .Net Core 3.0 preview availability with the long hailed support for desktop applications. Till now you could use .Net Core to build mostly web applications or console application, but starting with .Net Core 3.0 developers will be able to build Windows desktop applications on .Net Core. This step was already announced in May at the Build conference so therefore the .Net Core 3.0 preview availability is not unexpected for techhies that try to be active in the .Net ecosystem. Ignorance is however at high level and since the initial announcement at Build tech forums and discussion boards are full of questions and answers around the “cross-platform desktop applications” idea. So will we be able to run .Net Core 3.0 desktop applications on Windows, Linux and Mac? Of course NOT! That’s why I would like to get into a lot more detail on this point and finally outline what in my opinion really is the key benefit of creating .Net Core 3.0 desktop applications.  Continue reading

.Net Core online courses

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.Net Core is a constantly growing ecosystem and it becomes a viable option for developers, mostly due to the fact that you can easily develop applications for any operating systems or any platforms. Learning .Net Core becomes more and more a very good investment. Especially for those who want to start learning now, C# and .Net is in my opinion one of the best ways to start. I already wrote an article that explains why I believe this, so I won’t dive in this topic in this occasion.

On the other hand I feel a deep sense of responsibility to give back and that’s why my mission is to help regular people with passion for technology to become software developers. That’s mostly because as a self-taught developer I am fully aware of the challenges that people with passion for software would face until they get the first software developer role. That’s precisely the reason why I have started Codewrinkles Academy! I won’t dwell on what’s making this learning platform great, because I already did it (so check it out!). Right now I want to announce that a .Net Core learning path is available for registration. And I want to talk about the courses, time to completion and possible outcomes. Continue reading

An overview of Razor Components (server-side Blazor)

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I wrote about Blazor some time ago. Blazor is really cool in my opinion and, in a certain way, the future of web development (even if not in the form we might think of nowadays). It is a single-page web app framework built on .NET Core that runs in the browser with WebAssembly. The overview I made earlier is still valid so you might check it out. In this article however I want to offer a quick overview of a feature called Razor Components or server-side Blazor. Continue reading

Do you want to become a software developer? Here’s a good chance to start

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Do you want to become a software developer even if you didn’t study computer science? If yes, keep reading since this post might be interesting for you!

As many of my readers might know already, I did not study computer science at all. Still, I am working in the IT industry for around 10 years, half of which I’ve spend working at Microsoft. I started coding around 3 years ago and right now I am working as a full stack software developer. My primary focus is .Net Core and Angular 2+ when it comes to front end. A big part of my work experience had also to do with training, coaching, webinars. Continue reading

How to integrate Ocelot with Identity Server 4

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Not so long ago I wrote an article on how we can create our own API gateways using the Ocelot open source library. Since then, I received some questions on how to integrate Ocelot with Identity Server 4 so I thought to share how I managed to achieve this using the Ocelot documentation and some basic Identity Server 4 knowledge. Please note that following these steps I was able to successfully build an API gateway using Ocelot, that used Identity Server 4 JWT tokens to authorize requests and redirect them to the desired downstream path. Continue reading

New Asp.Net Core 2.1 features announced at #MsBuild

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Last week #MsBuild was underway in Seattle. I have already made some notes on the keynote last Monday and the following days I tried to keep track with different novelties announced for ASP.Net Core 2.1. And I think for some members of the community it might be useful to have them written down, so in this article I’ll try to summarize all the information. Please note, that I was not present at the #MsBuild conference. I just tried to follow the sessions streamed on Channel 9 and some key Twitter accounts.

HttpClientFactory

One of the novelties I am most exciting about is the new HttpClientFactory feature. If you worked with the HttpClient in production software, there is a good chance that you noticed a lot of challenges and head aches. In a services oriented architecture where we might need to have several different connections, the only way to go is to use several HttpClient instances (sure not for every call a new client 🙂 but still a bunch of them).  One of the problems is that each HttpClient would maintain its own connection pool to the remote server, so it’s highly inefficient. The second, and most stringent problem, is that in scenarios where an application needs to make a lot of calls to remote servers, you could exhaust all the available sockets from time to time. And this is really not cool at all.  Continue reading

Microsoft Build 2018 keynote summary

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The Microsoft Build 2018 kicked off today in Seattle with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella taking the stage and presenting Microsoft’s vision and strategy for the developer ecosystem. Scott Guthrie took then the audience through the main technical novelties with a lot of help from product managers and Microsoft partners or customers. If you missed the Microsoft Build 2018 keynote, here is a brief summary of what happened, taking note that it might be difficult to sum up in a few lines everything that was discussed for more than 3 hours.  Continue reading

Building your own ASP.Net Core API gateway with Ocelot

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I’m currently working on some very interesting stuff and one of it is building an Asp.Net Core API gateway. An API gateway might be a very useful part in a service oriented architecture using the micro services approach. In such an architecture you might have a lot of different APIs, each responsible only for one specific thing. Without an API gateway, consumers would need to send requests to each API and then aggregate the responses. An API gateway would do exactly this for the consumers (and many more of course) so that they would need to send only one request to one endpoint and the gateway would aggregate the needed response. Continue reading

Middleware in ASP.Net Core – part I

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Middleware is a very important topic in ASP.Net Core since it enables you to add very important functionality, like adding necessary configuration to deploy ASP.Net Core and Angular together. But at the same time there are a lot of misunderstandings regarding middleware in ASP.Net Core among developers that are new to the platform. That’s why I think it’s a good start to highlight the most important concepts regarding middleware so that new developers can get started much quicker with ASP.Net Core.

The concept of middleware

I won’t try to give a real and exhaustive definition of middleware (you can find this on the Microsoft documentation). Instead, I will try to depict a picture of how middleware in ASP.Net cor relate to the application you’re developing. So let’s imagine that you already have an ASP.Net Core application that is hosted somewhere and I want to make a request to that application. So when I send my GET request, it will first hit Kestrel, the web server built into ASP.Net Core. For the request, that’s the entry point to the application. Continue reading