Tag Archives: ASP.NET Core

Middleware in ASP.Net Core – part II

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Few days ago I wrote a short tutorial about middleware in ASP.Net Core and I promised to continue the topic, since there are some concepts that I didn’t cover. In the mentioned first tutorial I tried to describe what a middleware pipeline is, why middleware order is important and the importance of the next() delegate. In the second part I will focus more on the Use()Run() and Map() methods that we can use when setting up the middleware pipeline of an ASP.Net Core application.

Technically speaking Use()Run() and Map() are extension methods on Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder.IApplicationBuilder instances. If you look them up, you’ll see something like this: Continue reading

Middleware in ASP.Net Core – part I

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Middleware is a very important topic in ASP.Net Core since it enables you to add very important functionality, like adding necessary configuration to deploy ASP.Net Core and Angular together. But at the same time there are a lot of misunderstandings regarding middleware in ASP.Net Core among developers that are new to the platform. That’s why I think it’s a good start to highlight the most important concepts regarding middleware so that new developers can get started much quicker with ASP.Net Core.

The concept of middleware

I won’t try to give a real and exhaustive definition of middleware (you can find this on the Microsoft documentation). Instead, I will try to depict a picture of how middleware in ASP.Net cor relate to the application you’re developing. So let’s imagine that you already have an ASP.Net Core application that is hosted somewhere and I want to make a request to that application. So when I send my GET request, it will first hit Kestrel, the web server built into ASP.Net Core. For the request, that’s the entry point to the application. Continue reading

Deploy ASP.Net Core back end with Angular front end

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Single page applications (SPA) have become a standard in the web development world by now, reshaping the way web applications are designed. Traditionally a web browser (client) would send out a GET request to a server and the server would return an HTML page. Nowadays we have SPAs that rely on web APIs for data retrieval and that run like real applications in a browser. That’s why in the .Net ecosystem having  .Net Core web APIs with Angular 2+ front end is a common scenario and it might be useful to look into different basic deployment strategies. Before I go any further, I want to point out that this article is aimed for junior developers, developers that are new to the .Net ecosystem or for all those that are on their way to become software developers. Continue reading

Building SPAs with C#

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Looking at this title, many developers would say “Are you mad? You can’t build single page applications with C#! You need a front end framework, like Angular, React or Vue”. Right now I can’t say that I can prove them wrong, but I can definitely at least say that building SPAs with C# is in fact possible. For now it’s only experimental, but the ASP.NET team announced an experimental project called Blazor. Blazor is an experimental web UI framework based on C#, Razor, and HTML that runs completely in the browser via WebAssembly. This really opens new perspectives on the fact that you may build modern SPAs using C# and the entire .NET stack.  Continue reading

Databases for modern web applications

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Databases are one of the first things to think about when developing new software, especially web applications. I know that at a first sight, this topic seems to be a little odd: you simply use a relational database like SQL or MySQL ant that’s it, right? Well, I think that modern web applications are a little bit more complex and it might be worth considering other options and that’s why I would like to tackle this topic.

Traditional relational databases are clearly a goo fit for static applications. By static I think about applications that don’t change very often or that don’t require a huge amount of read and write operations. For example, if I would like to build my own blog at a certain time, I would surely choose SQL. And if I think about the data model for a blog post, it could be designed as something like this: Continue reading