.Net Core online courses

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.Net Core is a constantly growing ecosystem and it becomes a viable option for developers, mostly due to the fact that you can easily develop applications for any operating systems or any platforms. Learning .Net Core becomes more and more a very good investment. Especially for those who want to start learning now, C# and .Net is in my opinion one of the best ways to start. I already wrote an article that explains why I believe this, so I won’t dive in this topic in this occasion.

On the other hand I feel a deep sense of responsibility to give back and that’s why my mission is to help regular people with passion for technology to become software developers. That’s mostly because as a self-taught developer I am fully aware of the challenges that people with passion for software would face until they get the first software developer role. That’s precisely the reason why I have started Codewrinkles Academy! I won’t dwell on what’s making this learning platform great, because I already did it (so check it out!). Right now I want to announce that a .Net Core learning path is available for registration. And I want to talk about the courses, time to completion and possible outcomes. Continue reading

An overview of Razor Components (server-side Blazor)

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I wrote about Blazor some time ago. Blazor is really cool in my opinion and, in a certain way, the future of web development (even if not in the form we might think of nowadays). It is a single-page web app framework built on .NET Core that runs in the browser with WebAssembly. The overview I made earlier is still valid so you might check it out. In this article however I want to offer a quick overview of a feature called Razor Components or server-side Blazor. Continue reading

Classes and objects. Programming vs philosophy

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Few days back I had an interesting discussion with a colleague. We both have studied philosophy earlier in our lives so our discussion went into an interesting direction of mapping programming concepts, more specifically OOP concepts, to philosophical ideas. This discussion was very interesting to me, since when I started to learn programming I did not try to do this at all. It’s strange because it would have been probably easier to learn using analogies to familiar concepts. Most probably, I was thinking at that time that programming and philosophy are totally unrelated. The discussion with my colleague proved me wrong, so I thought about writing a short piece aimed to map classes and objects, one of the pillars of object oriented programming, to philosophical ideas. Continue reading

All that glitters is not gold

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All that glitters is not gold” is a well-known saying, meaning that not everything that looks precious or true turns out to be so. Does this also apply to software development? I’m fairly sure it does, since being attracted by glitters comes natural especially when you are not a very experienced software developer. As I do not considered myself a very experienced developer, I’m not afraid to say that I was attracted by glitters more than once and learned the hard way that all that glitters is not gold. Let me explain! Continue reading

Do you want to become a software developer? Here’s a good chance to start

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Do you want to become a software developer even if you didn’t study computer science? If yes, keep reading since this post might be interesting for you!

As many of my readers might know already, I did not study computer science at all. Still, I am working in the IT industry for around 10 years, half of which I’ve spend working at Microsoft. I started coding around 3 years ago and right now I am working as a full stack software developer. My primary focus is .Net Core and Angular 2+ when it comes to front end. A big part of my work experience had also to do with training, coaching, webinars. Continue reading

Data as a new global currency! Thoughts about machine learning and artificial intelligence

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This week I attended an artificial intelligence workshop organized by the company I work for and very nicely delivered by Richard Jarvis from DXC. Therefore, I think it would be nice to share some things I’ve learned there alongside with some personal thoughts on buzz words like, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

First of all there is a huge misconception that those who are not math geniuses should probably stay away from this topic. I learned during the workshop that this is simply not true. Sure, if you really want to dive deep into machine learning algorithms researches you need to know mathematics. Fortunately, the world won’t probably need as many researchers as people who are aware how things work and that are able to build applications and bring value to users by relying on the research that’s already been made. Why I say that? Continue reading

Playing around with ASP.Net Core ConfigureServices()

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These days I’m working on a small personal project with ASP.Net Core and this allowed me play around with the ConfigureServices method in Startup.cs and discover some things I wasn’t aware of. So I though on sharing my experiments here to see what others have to say about them.

Even if the application itself is fairly simple I decided to create several different projects in a solution to keep things open for extensions, right? So what I have is an ASP.Net Core API project and a bunch of different other projects like Sample.Core, Sample.Infrastructure, Sample.Dal. For the data access layer I wanted to play around with the repository pattern and created a very simple and insecure repository to handle operations on the Azure Table Storage service. Continue reading

How to integrate Ocelot with Identity Server 4

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Not so long ago I wrote an article on how we can create our own API gateways using the Ocelot open source library. Since then, I received some questions on how to integrate Ocelot with Identity Server 4 so I thought to share how I managed to achieve this using the Ocelot documentation and some basic Identity Server 4 knowledge. Please note that following these steps I was able to successfully build an API gateway using Ocelot, that used Identity Server 4 JWT tokens to authorize requests and redirect them to the desired downstream path. Continue reading

New Asp.Net Core 2.1 features announced at #MsBuild

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Last week #MsBuild was underway in Seattle. I have already made some notes on the keynote last Monday and the following days I tried to keep track with different novelties announced for ASP.Net Core 2.1. And I think for some members of the community it might be useful to have them written down, so in this article I’ll try to summarize all the information. Please note, that I was not present at the #MsBuild conference. I just tried to follow the sessions streamed on Channel 9 and some key Twitter accounts.

HttpClientFactory

One of the novelties I am most exciting about is the new HttpClientFactory feature. If you worked with the HttpClient in production software, there is a good chance that you noticed a lot of challenges and head aches. In a services oriented architecture where we might need to have several different connections, the only way to go is to use several HttpClient instances (sure not for every call a new client 🙂 but still a bunch of them).  One of the problems is that each HttpClient would maintain its own connection pool to the remote server, so it’s highly inefficient. The second, and most stringent problem, is that in scenarios where an application needs to make a lot of calls to remote servers, you could exhaust all the available sockets from time to time. And this is really not cool at all.  Continue reading

Microsoft Build 2018 keynote summary

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The Microsoft Build 2018 kicked off today in Seattle with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella taking the stage and presenting Microsoft’s vision and strategy for the developer ecosystem. Scott Guthrie took then the audience through the main technical novelties with a lot of help from product managers and Microsoft partners or customers. If you missed the Microsoft Build 2018 keynote, here is a brief summary of what happened, taking note that it might be difficult to sum up in a few lines everything that was discussed for more than 3 hours.  Continue reading